Physical Activity

  • “Parents interested in the health and academic success of their offspring should focus on the increased prevalence of various metabolic pathologies in which sedentary behaviour plays a key etiologic role, for example, obesity and type 2 diabetes, both of which are beginning at an ever younger age” (Trudeau & Shephard, 2008, p.9)
  • “91 per cent of Canadian children and youth do not meet the guidelines set forth in Canada’s Physical Activity Guides for Children and Youth, which recommend 90 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity” (Active Health Kids Canada, 2007, p.6)
  • “In recent analyses, sedentary screen-time behaviour (i.e., TV/video viewing, computer usage) was shown to be consistently and significantly associated with increased body mass index and a decreased level of physical activity” (Active Health Kids Canada, 2007, p.10)
  • “Available data from the NLSCY indicate that on average, 60 to 80 per cent of children and youth in Canada are participating in organized sport programs as well as unorganized sport activities.  Results indicate that while boys and girls have relatively equal participation rates in organized sports, boys tend to be more active in unorganized sports” (Active Health Kids Canada, 2007, p.11).
  • “Physical activity has been shown to be related to improved concentration and memory as well as academic performance” (Active Health Kids Canada, 2007, p.14).
  • “fewer than half of Canadian children and youth are active enough to ensure healthy growth and development” (Active Health Kids Canada, 2007, p. 15).
  • “In 2000–2001 56% of Canadians were physically inactive which means that 56% of
  • Canadians were physically inactive” (The Canadian Population Health Initiative, 2004, p.121).
  • “In 2000–2001, 44% of Canadians reported being active or moderately active during leisure time” (The Canadian Population Health Initiative, 2004, p.121).
  • “75% of boys and 61% of girls reported being active or moderately active in 2000–2001, up slightly since 1994–1995” (The Canadian Population Health Initiative, 2004, p.121).
  • “in 2000–2001, four out of five Canadian youth aged 12 to 19 were not active enough to meet international guidelines for optimal growth and development” (The Canadian Population Health Initiative, 2004, p.122).
  • “Helping kids build physical activity into their daily routine, helps to create a pattern that may very well stay with the for the rest of their lives” (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2002, p.2).
  • “Over half of Canada’s children and youth are not active enough for healthy growth and development.  Additional evidence suggests that a lack of physical activity is dangerous to their health and can be a major contributor of weight gain and obesity” (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2002, p.2).
  • “Physical activity is fun! Every child, no matter their age, height, weight, natural abilities or skills, needs to learn that physical activity is fun and it does not have to be competitive. While participation in sports is encouraged, children need to know that sports are not the only way to stay active. Not all children enjoy competition. For these children, physical activity alternatives such as walking to school, household chores, biking and other activities are essential” (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2002, p.3).
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